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Neuroscience Institute

Ongoing Events:

  • Brains & Behavior Distinguished Lecture Series
  • NIBL, Neurophilosophy, Spineless Neuroscience, Neuroendocrinology and more...
  • For more information about current events click here. 

    At the Institute:

    • Professor Marise Parent has been awarded the 2014 Faculty Award for Undergraduate Research. Read more...
    • Neuroscience B.S./M.S. program began in Fall 2014. Learn more...
    • We are pleased to announce that the GSU Neuroscience Institute has been awarded a Nu Rho Psi Honor Society charter. Read more...
    • Adriano Senatore, who recently arrived as a post-doctoral associate in Paul Katz's lab, has been awarded the Governor General's Gold Medal, the highest honor for a graduate student in Canada.  Dr. Senatore is also the recipient of a post-doctoral fellowship from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)Read more...
    • Congratulations to Sarah Pope, a first year Neuroscience doctoral student in the Hopkins' lab and a Primate Cognition 2CI fellow, who has been awarded a prestigious Chateaubriand Fellowship to study the neural correlates of communication in baboons at the Aix-Marseille Univ. in France from Sept. 2013-June 2014.  Read more...
    • The Neuroscience Institute congratulates the winners of this year's Brains & Behavior seed grant competition. Read more...
    • Earn your PhD in Neuroscience at Georgia State. go to graduate program page.

     Research & Community News:

    • NI Professor Sarah Pallas was part of a delegation from the Society for Neuroscience that visited Capital Hill on March 26, 2014, to lobby for brain research funding. Read more...
    • Three Neuroscience undergraduate students, Rebecca Bierman, Nathan Hardcastle, and Colin Istvan, took third place overall at the Georgia State University Research Conference (GSURC) on 4/10/14. These students took a project they had conceived and designed in the NEUR 3010 lab in Fall 2013 and continued to work on it this semester in open lab time on a volunteer basis in order to complete their award-winning GSURC poster.
    • On 4/14/14, Brains & Behavior fellow Devaleena Pradhan received a leadership award in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities & Colleges.
    • Brains & Behavior fellow Devaleena Pradhan's research paper entitled "Contexual regulation of androgen effects on agonistic interactions" is featured on the cover of the January 2014 issue of Hormones & Behavior.  It is the multi-talented Devaleena's own water color painting of a male bluebanded goby caring for eggs in his nest. Have a look
      here...
    • Arianna Tavacakis, a Neuroscience Ph.D. student in Paul Katz’s lab, was awarded a Sigma Xi Grant-in-Aid of Research (http://www.sigmaxi.org/programs/giar/) for her proposal entitled, “Investigating serotonin receptor expression underlying independently evolved swimming behaviors in Nudipleura sea slugs”.  As she states in the introduction to her proposal, “Evolution shapes behaviors through subtle changes to the nervous system, [which] lead to vast differences in behaviors.” Arianna is examining subtle changes such as differences in the relative expression of serotonin (5-HT) receptor types in individual neurons.  She is doing this in three species of sea slugs, two of which independently evolved a particular style of swimming, which the third species lacks.  Using transcriptome data from the Katz lab, she has identified all five known molluscan 5-HT receptor subtypes.  She has cloned several of these and now plans in situ hybridization and single neuron quantitative PCR experiments to determine precisely which neurons express which receptors and in what relative amounts.  This work will help determine how similar nervous systems were repurposed for different behaviors and whether independent evolution of these behaviors used the same neuromodulatory mechanisms.
    • "This isn't the sea hare you were looking for." BBC, Scientific American, Science, National Geographic, Discover, New Scientist, Yahoo, NBC, Huffington Post, io9, and others report that the Neuroscience Institute's Charles Derby, Juan Aggio, and Tiffany Love-Chezem discovered how sea hares defend themselves. Using a mix of ink and opaline, Aplysia stop spiny lobsters and other predators. Their chemical weapons induce confusion, distraction, and demotivation, allowing a sea hare to escape after already being caught by a would-be predator. While one chemical defense, opaline, jams the lobster's sense of smell, the other, sea hare ink, combines both attractive and repellent odors.  With reduced ability to smell its intended prey, and diffusing odors that suggest something else better to eat may be near by…but not here…the lobster spares the sea hare. read more...
    • The composition of the Neuroscience Institute reflects the interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to neuroscience that characterizes research at Georgia State University. Read more about the Neuroscience Institute...

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